Google’s LYNA Identifies Cancer That Has Spread in the Lymph Nodes

 Google’s LYNA pic

Google’s LYNA
Image: googleblog.com

An associate director in Mylan’s Department of Global Medical Affairs, Carl Bazan, MD, maintains an abiding interest in developments in the areas of nutrition and cancer research. Dr. Carl Bazan is particularly absorbed by novel ways of diagnosing cancer and cancer-staging technologies.

One emerging technology that recently went through a proof-of-concept study is Google’s LYNA, which takes a deep-learning and an AI approach to detecting hard-to-identify cancer cells that have passed into the lymph nodes. Taking a patient-specific biopsy heatmap as a basis, LYNA examines the biopsy at a variety of magnifications and uses an algorithm to recognize hidden cancer cell patterns.

This knowledge is critical in staging diverse types of cancer and understanding the aggressiveness of a particular tumor. Unfortunately, mobilized cancer cells are identified early enough for optimal treatment in less than 40 percent of cases at present. When metastasized cancer cells in the lymph nodes are identified through LYNA, the pathologist can coordinate appropriate treatment with radiologists and surgeons, among others.

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Google’s LYNA Identifies Cancer That Has Spread in the Lymph Nodes

Carl Bazan

Carl Bazan

An associate director in Mylan’s Department of Global Medical Affairs, Carl Bazan, MD, maintains an abiding interest in developments in the areas of nutrition and cancer research. Dr. Carl Bazan is particularly absorbed by novel ways of diagnosing cancer and cancer-staging technologies.

One emerging technology that recently went through a proof-of-concept study is Google’s LYNA, which takes a deep-learning and an AI approach to detecting hard-to-identify cancer cells that have passed into the lymph nodes. Taking a patient-specific biopsy heatmap as a basis, LYNA examines the biopsy at a variety of magnifications and uses an algorithm to recognize hidden cancer cell patterns.

This knowledge is critical in staging diverse types of cancer and understanding the aggressiveness of a particular tumor. Unfortunately, mobilized cancer cells are identified early enough for optimal treatment in less than 40 percent of cases at present. When metastasized cancer cells in the lymph nodes are identified through LYNA, the pathologist can coordinate appropriate treatment with radiologists and surgeons, among others.

ACRP Rolls Out New Online Research Ethics Course

Association of Clinical Research Professionals pic

Association of Clinical Research Professionals
Image: acrpnet.org

An accomplished clinical researcher, Dr. Carl Bazan leverages more than two decades of experience in his current role as associate director of Global Medical Affairs at Mylan in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. Alongside his everyday work, Dr. Carl Bazan remains connected to the clinical research community through membership in the Association of Clinical Research Professionals (ACRP).

With the recent move by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to phase out its Protecting Human Research Participants online curriculum, ACRP announced that it will be offering its own online training focusing on ethical issues in human-subject research trials. The course will be offered at no cost to clinical research professionals worldwide.

In his comments, ACRP executive director Jim Kremidas said the course is part of the organization’s ongoing commitment to promoting ethical and responsible research. Clinical research professionals who want more information or to take part in the online course should visit acrpnet.org/ethics to learn more. Those who want to implement the course on an organizational level are encouraged to visit acrpnet.org/stafftraining for more information.

The Potential of Elongated Telomeres in Combatting Disease

Carl Bazan

Carl Bazan

A decade into precision medicine clinical trials, Dr. Carl Bazan oversees clinical investigation sites worldwide. Dr. Carl Bazan has extensive research experience in human telomere length and its connection with aging, with a focus on elongating telomeres to combat diseases such as cancer.

With the nucleus of cells containing chromosomes, or double-stranded twisted DNA molecules, telomeres are the stretches of DNA that inhabit the ends of the chromosomes. Like shoelaces, they serve to protect vital genetic data. When cells divide these telomeres become shorter and ultimately reach a length where the cell is not able to divide. At this point the cell is senescent or inactive and may die. This shortening process has been linked with cancer and aging, and related risks of mortality.

Geneticists at institutions like the University of Utah are researching whether telomerase could be lengthened and in the process “immortalize” human cells. The potential is that specific cells with elongated telomeres could be mass produced and transplanted into the human body. These would include insulin-producing cells to target diabetes, cartilage cells to combat arthritis, and muscle cells for addressing muscular dystrophy.